Britain's most expensive street where average home costs £17million: Belgravia Crescent tops list of 50 addresses which dominate London.
December 12th 2014
The next most expensive street was nearby Eaton Square, where property sells for an average of £15.5million and former residents include Nigella Lawson. The celebrity chef once owned a £25million home at the address and property tycoon Scot Young, who fell to his death this week from his flat in Marylebone, also owned an apartment there. London and the South East dominated the top 50 list of priciest streets – with the top ten all in the capital’s wealthy enclaves of Belgravia, Knightsbridge, Kensington, Chelsea and Notting Hill. Yesterday, a security guard for a Qatari family who live in a flat in Grosvenor Crescent described the homes as ‘big, very big’. He said: ‘We always have security on guard and there is CCTV. If you’re a visitor, you have to arrange an appointment and then be searched when you come in.’ The street is also home to the Belgian embassy, while numbers 3-10 were for many years the headquarters of the British Red Cross before it was sold in 2005 for £30million and again in 2008 for £85million. The block is now owned by the Grosvenor Group – controlled by the Duke of Westminster, one of Britain’s wealthiest landowners. The firm has turned the building into lavish flats, some with their own private swimming pools, gyms and underground parking along with Italian marble floors.
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Britain's most expensive street where average home costs £17million: Belgravia Crescent tops list of 50 addresses which dominate London.
December 12th 2014
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The next most expensive street was nearby Eaton Square, where property sells for an average of £15.5million and former residents include Nigella Lawson. The celebrity chef once owned a £25million home at the address and property tycoon Scot Young, who fell to his death this week from his flat in Marylebone, also owned an apartment there. London and the South East dominated the top 50 list of priciest streets – with the top ten all in the capital’s wealthy enclaves of Belgravia, Knightsbridge, Kensington, Chelsea and Notting Hill. Yesterday, a security guard for a Qatari family who live in a flat in Grosvenor Crescent described the homes as ‘big, very big’. He said: ‘We always have security on guard and there is CCTV. If you’re a visitor, you have to arrange an appointment and then be searched when you come in.’ The street is also home to the Belgian embassy, while numbers 3-10 were for many years the headquarters of the British Red Cross before it was sold in 2005 for £30million and again in 2008 for £85million. The block is now owned by the Grosvenor Group – controlled by the Duke of Westminster, one of Britain’s wealthiest landowners. The firm has turned the building into lavish flats, some with their own private swimming pools, gyms and underground parking along with Italian marble floors.
Britain's most expensive street where average home costs £17million: Belgravia Crescent tops list of 50 addresses which dominate London.
December 12th 2014
The next most expensive street was nearby Eaton Square, where property sells for an average of £15.5million and former residents include Nigella Lawson. The celebrity chef once owned a £25million home at the address and property tycoon Scot Young, who fell to his death this week from his flat in Marylebone, also owned an apartment there. London and the South East dominated the top 50 list of priciest streets – with the top ten all in the capital’s wealthy enclaves of Belgravia, Knightsbridge, Kensington, Chelsea and Notting Hill. Yesterday, a security guard for a Qatari family who live in a flat in Grosvenor Crescent described the homes as ‘big, very big’. He said: ‘We always have security on guard and there is CCTV. If you’re a visitor, you have to arrange an appointment and then be searched when you come in.’ The street is also home to the Belgian embassy, while numbers 3-10 were for many years the headquarters of the British Red Cross before it was sold in 2005 for £30million and again in 2008 for £85million. The block is now owned by the Grosvenor Group – controlled by the Duke of Westminster, one of Britain’s wealthiest landowners. The firm has turned the building into lavish flats, some with their own private swimming pools, gyms and underground parking along with Italian marble floors.
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